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Planning for the Fall Garden

While the calendar may still read summer, autumn is right around the corner and it is time to start gearing up for the season. By planting a few seasonal super stars now you can extend your garden’s beauty until winter’s first hard frost.

Perennials – Each season has its own color palette and fall is one of the richest of them all. There are perennials that you can add to your garden now that will bolster autumn’s tapestry. Purple asters and blue salvias are wonderful color complements to the red, orange and gold foliage of the season.

And if you are a savvy shopper then you know that garden centers offer end-of-the-season prices to reduce their inventory before winter sets in. This means now is the time to get some great deals on plants that have yet to shine.

Here is a short list of some of my favorite autumn super stars:
Goldenrod ‘Fireworks’ (perennial)
Aster ‘Alma Potchke’ (perennial)
Salvia vanhouttii ‘Paul’ (perennial)
Japanese Anemone (perennial)
Hardy Begonia (perennial)
Arkansas Amsonia (perennial)
Autumn Fern (perennial)
Autumn Crocus (perennial bulb)
Lycoris (perennial bulb)
Nerine (perennial bulb)

Fall Flower BorderOrnamental Grasses – The texture and movement of ornamental grasses makes them well suited to the fall season. Look for varieties such as miscanthus ‘Morning Light’, calamagrostis ‘Karl Foerster’ and dwarf fountain grass ‘Little Bunny’.

Annuals – When it comes to pumping up the color in your garden it is hard to beat annuals. You can breathe new life into your summer annuals by applying a liquid fertilizer every 7 to 10 days and cutting back those that have grown leggy.

If you live in a region where warm summer weather extends well into fall, sow a second wave of fast growing annual flowers such as cosmos, gomphrena and celosia.

And save room for cool season favorites such as violas, pansies and snapdragons.

Container Gardens – Plan on revamping your container gardens for fall with a few “slip- in” plants. These are the plants you can add now to replace tired-looking summer flowers. Some substitutes I rely on are kale, pansies, snapdragons or ornamental grasses. Small trees and shrubs with striking foliage also a nice choice for giving your container gardens an autumnal glow. Try Virginia sweet spire, euonymus, Japanese maple, dwarf crape myrtle and fothergilla. At the end of the season, before the ground freezes you can transplant these into your garden’s flower borders.

Shrubs and Trees – The true stars of the fall landscape are those trees and shrubs that produce brilliantly colored foliage.

In Northern regions plant trees and shrubs in the ground well before the first frost date in your area so they can get established before cold weather sets in. Warm climate gardeners should wait until the heat breaks in the fall before planting. You will find that the cooler temperatures and more plentiful rain of autumn make the job of caring for newly planted trees and shrubs much easier.

Vegetables – Like the early days of spring, the cool temperatures in fall are ideal for growing certain vegetables such as leafy greens, broccoli and Brussels sprouts. Now is the time to get out your seed catalogs and place your order for lettuce, spinach and arugula. Vegetables such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts and cabbage are better started from transplants purchased at a local garden center. In my mid-South zone 7 garden I begin planting as soon as I sense that the heat is about the break, which is usually late August to mid-September.

When determining your planting date and selecting crops for your vegetable garden, you need to know the number of days it will take for a plant to mature and the first frost date of the season. You might think the best way to know when to plant is to take your average frost date and backup the number of days until maturity. But this doesn’t take into account the cooler and shorter days to come. It’s actually better to come up with an imaginary harvest date a few weeks before frost and back up from there.

Estimated First Frost Dates by Zone
Zone 3 – September 1st – 30th
Zone 4 – September 1st – 30th
Zone 5 – September 30th – October 30th
Zone 6 – September 30th – October 30th
Zone 7 – October 15th – November 15th
Zone 8 – October 30th – November 30th
Zone 9 – November 30th – December 30th
Zone 10 – November 30th – December 30th
Zone 11 – Frost Free

The Bare Essentials

beautiful pink peony on a sunny day outside

Somewhere between seeds and seedlings is the bare-root plant starter.
It may not look as pretty as the potted plants you get in the nursery, or as promising as a fresh packet of seeds, but it’s every bit as viable.
The bare-root starter is a live plant in a dormant state. It will arrive when it’s ready to go in the ground and it’s essentially the root system of a plant with the dirt removed. The roots will converge into a “crown,” which is the top of the plant and faces up towards the sky.
I’ve always had success with bare-root bulbs, which can be planted in spring or fall. Much like with seeds, you must be patient with these plants as it can take anywhere from six to eight weeks before you start to see obvious growth.

Tips for growing bare-root plants:
– Your bare-root plant will arrive in a plastic bag, and should be damp, but not too moldy. Your new plant should go in the ground as soon as possible, but if you need a few days, you can store them in a cool dry place, like a cool garage or a basement. They can be kept this way for about 5 days.
– Sometimes bare root plants can dry out during transit so it is a good idea to soak them in a bucket of water for 2 to 4 hours to rehydrate them before planting. Warmth and moisture will signal them to start growing so check on them occasionally to be sure they aren’t getting moldy or soft.
– Follow the instructions for planting, and take care not to plant too deep. Many times bare-root plants won’t thrive or bloom if the crown is too far below the surface.
– Once planted, give them a bit of water, but not too much. The roots will need time to adjust to their new home, and you don’t want to add more stress.
– Wait to fertilize until your plant is about 6 inches tall. You can also add a bit of mulch at this time.

Caring for Summer Annuals

Whether you are interested in growing annuals to use as cut flowers, or just to add color and blooms to your garden, there are a few basic principles you can follow for a more successful growing season and a more beautiful garden.

Coreopsis at Moss Mountain Farm

Watering Annuals

When it comes to watering the key is consistency. You never want your flowerbeds or containers to dry out completely. This can be tough on your plants, particularly young ones. They rarely recover. One of my favorite ways to water is to use a soaker hose. It deep soaks the ground, which encourages a deep root system and a stronger plant. Then I just put a layer of mulch around them, to hold in the moisture.

Osteospermum and Diascia

Fertilizing Annuals

To grow beautiful stands of annuals it is important to feed the plants. An organic slow-release fertilizer will cut down on the amount of time spent applying fertilizer and you won’t have to worry about burning the plants by over feeding. Choose one that includes microorganisms that will enrich the soil too.

Another way to keep your flowers blooming longer is to remove spent flowers. If this seems like too much work, look for varieties that are self-cleaning, which means the dead blossoms will drop on their own.

Hardy Volunteers

Now at the end of the season, to encourage hardy volunteers like larkspur, bachelor buttons and globe amaranth to come back next year, I shake the plants out and make sure the seeds get scattered through the beds. Then next spring they come up and bloom again.

A mixed border of shrub roses, perennials and annuals.

Furnishing Your Garden Room

Although the summer solstice falls on June 21, I think of Memorial Day as the introduction of summer in my zone 8A garden.

During summer our indoor activities such as dining and entertaining move outdoors so it just makes sense to have an area set up to enjoy them. In just a few easy steps a patio, porch or secluded spot in the garden can become an extension of your home’s interior spaces.

One of the easiest ways to give an outdoor room plenty of indoor charm is to add several “fool-the-eye” interior elements such as rugs, cushions, and other interior accessories. With today’s weather resistant fabrics and finishes you can create a stylish scene in no time by following a few simple tips.

Define the Space with a RugDefine the Space with an Outdoor Rug
An outdoor rug will give your setting an instant indoor feel, plus the edges of the rug create the illusion of four walls. Furnishings arranged around the rug further re-enforce this illusion.

Caring for an outdoor rug is usually quite easy since they are often made of durable natural fibers or synthetic materials. You can spray off the rug with a hose or use a brush broom to clean it. To prevent mildew, hang the rug over a chair or railing to dry after a rain, even if it is made from mildew resistant material. This will allow air to circulate on both sides, which speeds up the drying time. If the rug can’t be picked up, just roll back the edges.

Spruce Up FurnitureFurnishings
Too often outdoor furnishings fail to rise to the same level of comfort and style as interior rooms. Break the “white plastic chair syndrome” by finding outdoor furniture that serves as a better reflection of your home’s décor. Garage sales, antique stores and home improvement centers offer a wide variety of options.

It’s easy to give your garden furniture new life with a coat of paint. First evaluate the material you are working with – is it man made or natural? Then pick an appropriate paint that can withstand the weather. Once the paint is dry coat it with a water seal to give it a longer life. Metal furnishings can be sandblasted and taken to a powder coating shop where a virtually indestructible layer of paint is applied. Wooden pieces should be given protection during the cold, wet months and may require touch ups from time to time.

When choosing colors for your setting, the basic rules apply – vibrant reds, oranges and yellow draw the eye, while cooler hues such as soft blues, pinks and purples increase the sense of space. Furniture in bright colors is best placed in areas where you want to make a deliberate statement such as eye-catching red chairs against a dark green hedge. In a muted green, the same set will blend in with its surroundings.

Use Bright FabricFabrics
Fabric stores are stocking more and more indoor-outdoor fabric that’s brighter than ever before. What’s great about using this type of fabric is that it has been tested for years in marine environments so you know you’re getting a product that can really take the elements.

Consider using cushion covers that you can slip over the existing lawn furnishing cushions. You can throw these in the wash when needed and they make it easy to change the look of your garden room from year to year. If you’re not a seamstress, but want to try making pillow covers cut out an “envelope” of fabric that can be wrapped around the pillow. Use self-adhesive Velcro to affix the envelope tabs together.

Colorful tablecloths are an even easier way to add bold splashes of color. Again, if you aren’t into sewing use pinking shears to trim the edges of the fabric to create a clean line.

CabanaPergola or Cabana
The “must have” accessory for gardeners with a little extra room is a covered place to create an outdoor space. Fabric cabanas and pergolas are popping up everywhere. I was impressed with the price range – anywhere from $150 to the thousands of dollars depending on the size and style you choose. As added bonus these structures can be outfitted with mosquito netting to block out these little pests.

Accessories
An outdoor setting is tailor made for delighting the senses so when choosing accessories for your garden room go for items that will heighten the experience. Dramatic lighting is a must. Lighting Created AmbianceString up lights and set out candles. Battery operated LED lighting is a fun new option that takes away the need for outdoor electricity and you can get LED tea candles; they look like the real thing, but won’t extinguish when the wind blows. Don’t forget plants. Fragrant flowers and soft, fuzzy foliage will add to the ambiance. A table top water fountain, wind chimes or music will create soft sounds to block out street noises.

As the weather warms and you start spending more time outdoors rethink the place where you live and look for opportunities to set the stage, if you will, and push the boundaries of your home past the walls of your house and out into the landscape beyond.

Homegrown Wedding Flowers

Whether you’re saying “I do” in spring, summer or fall, there are a bounty of blooms that are easy to grow for use in arrangements and bouquets. Here are a few of my favorite, garden stems for these three seasons.
Spring
Daffodils – If you’ve been to my farm, you know daffodils are one of my favorites. Plant the bulbs in the late fall and you’ll enjoy vases full of the yellow charmers as soon as the temperatures begin to warm.

Peonies – Peonies are one of the hardiest and most resilient plants in the garden. What’s more their prime time for blooming starts in mid-May and runs through June – perfect for the wedding season. If you plan to cut peonies from the garden, I suggest selecting half-opened blooms, simply because they will last longer.

Tulips – You can find a tulip in just about any shade and there are a variety of bloom shapes too. Plant bulbs in fall. Check the bloom time for the variety to make sure it will be in flower at the time of your ceremony.

Bouquet Idea
Contrast the cup shape of tulips with the soft curves of calla lilies. I think yellow calla lilies paired with pale yellow to cream tulips would be lovely.

Summer
Hydrangeas – Because hydrangeas are so full you only need a few stems to create a lush bouquet. It’s important to know Hydrangeas do have a tendency to lose their vitality, so you’ll want to keep them in a cool place and give them plenty of water after they are cut. If possible, cut them the morning of the wedding to ensure the freshest bouquet.

Lilies – Lilies will come back year after year and be prolific producers of open full blooms. White Oriental lilies make for an elegant and fragrant bouquet. For the best color selection choose an Asiatic variety. Be sure to remove lily stamens to keep the pollen from getting on clothes.

Zinnias – Plant zinnias and you’ll enjoy a bounty of wildflower-like beauty from early summer until the first frost. I like cutting these and loosely arranging a mason jar for an effortless look. For a bouquet, I suggest tying with natural raffia.

Bouquet Idea
For casual, but colorful flowers mix red, yellow and orange with pink and green zinnias.


Fall
Sunflowers – An iconic symbol of the close of summer and start of fall, cut a few sunflower stalks and loosely assemble with ribbon for a tied bouquet or simply enjoy their beauty in tall metal or glass vase.

Cockscomb – With a vase life of 5-10 days, cockscomb’s modern look makes for a hardy bouquet. Mix with other seasonal selections from your florist or market, such as button mums, for a fall display.

Dahlias – One of the most cheerful blooms in the garden, you’ll want to plant your dahlias around the same time you put tomatoes in the ground. You can expect to have cut flowers from late summer until the first frost.

Bouquet Idea
Any of these blooms would be lovely for a monochromatic arrangement or bouquet. All three offer varieties that produce different bloom forms so you can pick flowers in the same color family, but with different shapes.

If you are interested in any of these varieties to grow yourself, you can find several here!

Summer Bulbs

When a gardener mentions planting bulbs, the first flowers that often
come to mind may be daffodils and tulips. We plant these types in our
gardens in fall for glorious displays in the spring. But if you are
willing to expand your definition of a bulb, you will find a whole
new season of beautiful blooms and foliage in what I refer to as
summer bulbs. Now technically these plants include true bulbs,
along with tuberous roots, corms, and tubers or rhizomes, but
it is just simpler to use the blanket term – bulbs.

The plants that grow from summer bulbs will add a tropical touch
to your garden. Many varieties have thick fleshy leaves and exotic
flowers, which makes sense because most originate from subtropical
regions such as South American and South Africa. I like to mix them
in with my more traditional annuals and perennials to add a little
flair to my flower borders and containers.
Summer bulbs should be planted in late spring or early summer when
soil temperatures have warmed to about 55°F. In general
they should be planted close to the soil’s surface, about 1 to 2
inches deep. Choose a location that has well drained soil, unless
they are suited to boggy conditions. One of the nice characteristics
about these plants is that many types, such as elephant ears and
caladiums, will perform well in partial to full shade.

True to their sub-tropical heritage, these bulbs thrive in heat and
humidity, but you can also grow them in northern gardens. The trick
is to lift and store them in the fall before the first frost. How
you store the bulbs depends on what type of plant it is. Most are
lifted from the ground and stored in peat or vermiculite in a cool,
dry area.

To find unique varieties of summer bulbs you may have to go through
a mail order source. You can find a few of my favorites here!

Low Maintenance Garden

I live in the country, but work in town and find I have less and less time for my flower beds. I need some advice on how to make them more maintenance free, but still have some color and beauty.

I can certainly sympathize with your plight of not having enough time to spend in your flower garden. I love to garden and find it very relaxing, but there are times when it is just plain work.

 

My first suggestion would be to determine the amount of time you have to spend in your garden and then consider the size of your garden. Keep the design simple. Maybe reducing the manicured portion and enlarging the natural portion would alleviate some of the problem. Later on down the road if you find that you have extra time on your hands to spend in the garden you can always expand.

 

To make your flower beds easy to maintain, evaluate how your plantings work with their surroundings. A garden that works with rather than against the environmental conditions will save you time and effort. Group plants with similar cultural requirements together and in the right spot. For instance, combine drought tolerant plants in areas that stay dry and group plants that enjoy moist soil or ‘wet feet’ in a wetter area.
If you’re spending a considerable amount of time watering, consider putting in some drip irrigation lines and irrigate each zone separately.

While both perennial and annual flowers are beautiful, they can be heavy maintenance, especially if deadheading is required to keep them blooming or they spread aggressively. Be selective in your choice of plant material as some require much less care than others. And do the research; make sure the ones you choose are not prone to disease or insects. Consider using some of the smaller or dwarf flowering shrubs as they require less maintenance and flower beautifully. As an added bonus, look for those that are fragrant as well. At heights of 12, 18 or 24 inches, they integrate beautifully in flower beds.
Other ideas include installing a mowing strip such as a brick edge to your beds so you can mow close and eliminate line trimming. Use landscape fabric and mulch to help retain moisture and control weeds. Replenish your mulch once every year. Use ground covers as ‘living mulch’ to fill in bare spots. When you are ready to plant it the area simply pull out the ground cover. And keep your tools handy and organized. Wasting time searching for the right tool means less time spent enjoying your flowers.

 

There are a couple pieces of equipment I keep on hand to make garden tasks a little easier, too. The Garden Scoot, Bypass Loppers, Double Cut Hand Pruners, and a weeder and trowel set are a few things I can’t do without!

Rhythmic Blue Hydrangea P Allen Smith HSN Home Shopping Network Garden

P. Allen Smith’s Flower Garden Collection for Home Shopping Network HSN

Allen and the Moss Mountain Farm team are excited to share a special, curated collection of flowering beauties from Moss Mountain Farm. The P. Allen Smith Moss Mountain Farm flower garden collection includes perennials, hostas, daylilies, butterfly bushes and peonies. Tested in Allen’s garden under a number of conditions, he and his team selected specific ornamentals ideally suited for a wide variety of garden and home environments. Plants were evaluated on the basis of floral display, color, uniqueness, resilience, ease of care and value. Almost all selections are perennial and have been observed to return for up to 15-20 years. A handful have also been identified as “generational” perennials, flowers that will continue to return through many family generations!

An exclusive has been offered to Home Shopping Network (HSN) for calendar year 2018. This March, many HSN viewers were surprised–and delighted–to see Allen appear on the HSN garden segment. Guests may see (and purchase while available) Allen’s selections directly from the HSN website and may also visit his Moss Mountain Farm to see these and other collections on display.

Moss Mountain Farm is located beside Little Rock, AR, on a 650-acre bluff above the Arkansas River. Allen will return to HSN to offer additional garden beauties and plants that improve every homeowner’s yard later in the year.

To learn more about the plants offered through HSN, please see Allen’s Moss Mountain Farm HSN page located on the HSN website. You may research plant care instructions, zone appropriateness and also secure a selection for your home, while stock is still available here.

P. Allen Smith’s Moss Mountain Farm flower garden collection for Home Shopping Network HSN

P Allen Smith HSN Home Shopping Network Daylily
P Allen Smith holds day lilies from his Moss Mountain Farm flower garden collection for Home Shopping Network HSN

 

And, if you already know which plant you are interested in, you may find specific plants Allen presented on HSN using the links below.

 

Butterfly Bush P Allen Smith HSN
A Butterfly Bush attracts beautiful butterflies and is part of the P. Allen Smith Moss Mountain Farm Flower Garden Collection for HSN Home Shopping Network

Butterfly Bush

Put the call out in your garden with this gorgeous butterfly bush collection. They feature large flower panicles that cascade downward for a weeping look. They attract butterflies, bees and hummingbirds while resisting deer. And once established, they’re drought tolerant too. Best of all, the lovely lavender and pink colors promise to be a hit with your guests, both winged and non-winged alike!  Read more on HSN.

 

 

Rhythmic Blue Hydrangea P Allen Smith HSN Home Shopping Network Garden
Beautiful Rhythmic Blue Hydrangea, part of P Allen Smith’s collection for HSN Home Shopping Network

Rhythmic Blue Hydrangea

The Rhythmic Blue hydrangea features pink to rich blue flowers and geometric florets closely packed on sturdy stems. They make an excellent border plant and add variety and beauty to cut flower arrangements too.  Read more on HSN.

 

 

HSN Home Shopping Network P Allen Smith Reblooming Flag Collection Iris Immortality
Beautiful white flowers part of P Allen Smith’s HSN Home Shopping Network Moss Mountain Farm Reblooming Flag Collection, this variety is Iris Immortality
Reblooming Flag Collection City Lights P Allen Smith Home Shopping Network HSN
Reblooming Flag Collection, variety City Lights by P Allen Smith for HSN Home Shopping Network Moss Mountain Farm Collection

Reblooming Flag Collection

Let your flag fly with this reblooming iris collection. Moss Mountain Farm brought together 5 magnificent iris varieties in one stunning collection. Use them for accents in a late spring garden or to draw bees for vibrancy and interest. They’re also resistant to pesky deer and rabbits.  Read more on HSN.

 

 

Foxglove DalPeach P Allen Smith HSN Home Shopping Network
Beautiful Foxglove DalPeach by P. Allen Smith for the HSN Home Shopping Network Moss Mountain Farm Flower Garden Collection.

Foxglove Collection

When spring arrives, summer is sure to follow, and these striking Foxglove plants will be there to meet it with their colorful blossoms. Bring home this collection comprised of three unique flowering plants. With blooms that range in color from rosy pink to soft peach, they’ll be a delight to watch as they grow to their full potential in your garden or patio planters. They’ll look especially lovely planted along a fence or right at woods’ edge and will enhance the appeal of any yard.  Read more on HSN.

 

 

Hosta Royal Standard P Allen Smith HSN Home Shopping Network Garden Flowers
P Allen Smith presented his Hosta Royal Standard Flower Garden collection from Moss Mountain Farm for HSN Home Shopping Network.

Hosta Collection

Get ready for an eruption of blooms when you plant this Hosta collection in your garden. This popular perennial is the perfect plant to place in a shady spot, and it pairs beautifully with Coral Bells and Astilbe. With at least five varieties of Hosta, this collection will bring something special to your garden or yard.  Read more on HSN.

 

 

Dwarf Canna Brilliant Canna P Allen Smith HSN Home Shopping Network Garden Flowers
Dwarf Canna Brilliant Canna by P Allen Smith for his Moss Mountain Farm flower Garden collection for HSN Home Shopping Network.

Dwarf Canna Collection

Cannas make a great backdrop for day lilies and other plants, work well in containers and can add interest to borders, particularly with other perennials.  Read more on HSN.

 

 

P Allen Smith HSN Home Shopping Network Flower Garden collection Hawaiian Coral Bell Peony P Allen Smith
Hawaiian Coral Bell Peony by P Allen Smith for HSN Home Shopping Network

Coral Peony Collection

This fragrant perennial’s long-lasting blooms are positively perfect for bouquets. They love heavy, well-drained soil and become drought tolerant once established. Best of all, they’ll bathe your garden in a rich color hues ranging from coral pinks to apricot and yellow.  Read more on HSN.

 

 

Coral Bell P Allen Smith for Home Shopping Network HSN
An example of Coral Bell P Allen Smith for Home Shopping Network HSN

Coral Bell Collection

These beautiful perennials work wonderfully in front of a border or rock garden. Use them in patio containers for a pop of color or to line yard and garden walkways. They’re easy to grow, thrive in partial shade and, our favorite, attract hummingbirds, bees and butterflies.  Read more on HSN.

 

 

Stella De Oro Daylily P Allen Smith for HSN Home Shopping Network

Bright yellow Stella De Oro Daylily by P Allen Smith for Home Shopping Network HSN

Stella De Oro Daylily Closeup P Allen Smith HSN Home Shopping Network
A closeup look at Stella De Oro Daylily by P Allen Smith

Stella de Oro, 25-piece Daylily Collection

With 25 plants that bloom over an extended period of time, this collection promises an abundance of fragrant, bright gold blossoms. They are one of the easiest perennials to grow and perform famously in the landscape, especially when grown in full sun.  Read more on HSN.

 

 

Double-Flowering Daylily Set

With three plants that produce huge, peony-like blooms, this collection of Day Lilies promises to give your garden the unique edge you’ve been working for. These easy-to-grow plants boast flowers in pink, red and purple and will give you the big pay off you want.  Read more on HSN.

 

10-Piece Daylily Collection

When you take the time to garden, you want it to pay off. With ten plants that produce a wide variety of unique blooms over an extended period of time, this collection of Day Lilies promises consistent color all summer long. These easy-to-grow plants boast flowers in various sizes, shapes and colors.  Read more on HSN.

 

 

which roses are right for your garden

Which Roses are Right for Your Garden?

My love affair with roses began when I was pursuing my graduate studies in England. During a tour of Arley Hall, I met Lady Ashbrook and we became fast friends, bonding over our love of gardens, design, and painting. Years later, I dedicated the rose garden at Moss Mountain Farm to Lady Ashbrook, who taught me so much about these charming flowers.

Once you start growing roses, I am sure that you will fall in love with them the way I did. Below are some of my favorites. No matter what conditions you grow in or the kind of roses you want, there’s an option that’s right for you. Read more