Category: Uncategorized

Garden Design in Lexington, Kentucky

There are many rewarding aspects of being a garden designer.  One of the first that comes to mind is seeing something that you’ve brought from your imagination and planted in the ground and then watched it grow over time. Another joy for me is to work on or around historic places,  sites that are storied have some sort of legacy or they fit into the fabric of the historic landscape. There is often a soul to these places that are almost impossible to replicate.

Several years ago I had an opportunity to help a couple in Lexington Kentucky in the historic District of that beautiful city. Along with this tree, line Avenue was a series of houses built as early as 1790 through to the 1880s and early 20th centuries. Their house was a brick 1870s Italianate Revival house that they had beautifully and lovingly restored. But, they wanted to garden that was consistent with the style and scale of the house.

While the house was certainly beautiful and the couple delightful, the project wasn’t without its challenges. You see, this house was set on a very long and narrow lot. As a designer, it was clear to me that it was going to be key to take what might have otherwise been seen as an obstacle and turn it into something compelling … if not intriguing to the owners and visitors.

My approach was to create a series of garden rooms. It’s a hallmark of the work that we do with many gardens, including what I’ve done at Moss Mountain Farm. From the back of the two-story house upper balcony of this historic home, I wanted to see a parterre garden of boxwood. The design , I felt, needed to be expressed with pattern and and demonstrate an element of formality. This space was a nod to the formal architecture of the home. You see, a  ‘garden should always bow to the house’ according to my great friend and garden designer Xa Tollemache. I couldn’t agree more.

This space, unfortunately,  is juxtaposed to the motor court and garage. So it was essential that this be screened from the parterre garden of which  I saw as an extension of the rooms of the house.

This was achieved by using a pleached Hornbeam hedge to separate visually the functional ( garage ) from the aesthetic (garden room). An arch in the pleached Hornbeam created an entrance to the garden from the motor court.  Like most parterres, they are best seen and appreciated from upper levels. And, happily, the raised  porches afforded the best views of the parterre and the garden rooms beyond.

Moving beyond this deeper into the garden visitors pass through a clipped yew hedge to separate the parterre from the next room designated for the swimming pool and its associated pool/guest house.

The final room at the back of the property was meant to be a bit of a surprise for visitors and it to was screened from the swimming pool area. Entering into the space you’re greeted by a large oval lawn bordered with azaleas, hosts, and fern and designed for entertaining. The perimeter of the lawn is punctuated with garden ornament. Early on in the project, we planted a dense southern magnolia screen across the back to provide privacy for this sanctuary.

Happily, this garden has matured beautifully over time and my clients, now friends, have followed the design intent of our original plans. Between the evergreen plantings that create the framework of the garden, there are spaces for what I refer to as areas of ‘intensive’ planting seasonal color in the way of tropicals, annuals perennials, and bulbs.

I couldn’t miss the opportunity to associate historically appropriate roses to this beautiful property. We chose six to seven varieties of heritage roses that would’ve been available and familiar to the residents of this house the day they moved in the 1870s. Among the roses include a few later varieties as well, such as ‘Awakening’ that beautifully pairs with Clematis’Mrs Cholmondeley’.

It’s a joy to engage in the art of gardening making, especially when the property lends itself to a series of rooms, each different, but all designed to respond to the architectural style of the house and the needs as desires of the residents.

 

 

Chicken Chat Agenda 3/27/21

10:00  – 10:15

Check-in and Welcome with Amos the Buff Orpington

 

10:15 – 11:00   

Moss Mountain Farm Best Poultry Practices – P. Allen Smith

P. Allen Smith will teach you how to get started raising poultry, and the tricks for having happy, healthy birds.

 

11:00 – 12:00

A Visit to Poultryville

Please observe all requests regarding biosecurity. Allen will be on hand to share information regarding the Moss Mountain Farm Heritage flocks.

 

12:00 – 1:00

Lunch & Shop

       

1:00 – 1:40

A Call for Conservation: Heritage Poultry Conservancy’s Mission with  P. Allen Smith

1:40 – 2:00

Q&A with P. Allen Smith

P. Allen Smith will be available for a lively question and answer session.

Closing Remarks and photos with 4Hers.

 

 

Birth Month Flower Chart

January – Snowdrop 

February – Iris 

March – Daffodil 

April – Sweet Pea 

May – Lily of the Valley 

June – Rose

July – Water Lily 

August – Poppy 

September – Morning Glory 

October – Cosmos 

November – Chrysanthemum 

December – Holly

50 Reasons To Build Walkable Communities

“Each of us has a responsibility to be better stewards of the planet. Today, we must not only conserve what we have but reverse the damage done to the environment. Good design is part of the solution.” — P. Allen Smith

 

 

I am proud to be involved with conservation developments around the country that respect the earth, improve our health, and are beautiful to live, work, and thrive within.  These communities are for all age groups, economic levels, and backgrounds.  I was cheered to come upon a recent article that highlights one aspect of my design values that I incorporate into each of these projects.  The article nicely articulates why our communities should be walkable rather than car-focused.  It’s a no brainer on many levels, but worth discussion, and I wanted to share this with you. 

Montava 50 Reasons To Build Walkable Communities reviews several of the top benefits of well-designed, walkable communities.  And while my communities include additional features that more closely link our homes and families to the earth, walkability within our communities is very important to me and one of my primary goals at the beginning of my design process.

Here is one such example that sadly many of us–including myself–can identify.  It involves commuting.  It has been found that if one shifts from a long commute to a walk, one’s happiness increases as much as if falling in love.  Wow!  Further “the benefits of walkability are all interconnected,” according to James Francisco, who is quoted in the article.  He elaborates, “maybe you want your local business to be enhanced by more foot traffic…[n]ot only do you get the economic vitality, but you get the social benefits–so people are out and having conversations and connecting–and then you get the health benefits.” 

Oliver-Smith

 

The number one reason for building walkable communities is reason enough for us to focus on this component in our community designs:  

It helps people live longer.

The article presents compelling statistics to support this claim.  Consider: inactivity is the fourth leading cause of mortality around the world; physical activity dropped 32% in the last four decades in the U.S., and 45% in less than two decades in China. For people over 60, walking just 15 minutes a day can reduce the risk of dying by 22%.

The report sifted through dozens of studies to quantify 50 benefits of walkability in cities.  To read more and learn about the 49 other benefits see: Build Walkable Communities.

DIY Cloth Face Mask & How to Clean It

CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies), especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

CDC also advises the use of simple cloth face coverings to slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others.  Cloth face coverings fashioned from household items or made at home from common materials at low cost can be used as an additional, voluntary public health measure.

Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.

The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators.  Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance.

Should cloth face coverings be washed or otherwise cleaned regularly? How regularly?

Yes. They should be routinely washed depending on the frequency of use.

How does one safely sterilize/clean a cloth face covering?

A washing machine should suffice in properly washing a face covering.

How does one safely remove a used cloth face covering?

Individuals should be careful not to touch their eyes, nose, and mouth when removing their face covering and wash hands immediately after removing.

Making your own mask can be super easy! The CDC has provided three simple ways to make your own mask. I made a mask from a soft T-Shirt I had lying around the house.

Click here for Sew and No Sew Instructions

 

 

Content source: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD)Division of Viral Diseases

DIY All-Natural Hand Sanitizer

This recipe is a natural solution for everyday use but at this time we suggest everyone follow the CDC guidelines for sanitation and the proper disinfectants identified for combating Covid-19.

 

MATERIALS

  • 2/3 cup witch hazel
  • 1 cup Aloe vera (more if desired)
  • 18 drops essential oils
  • 1 tsp fractionated coconut oil (optional)
  • Empty gel container 
  1. Add all the ingredients in a mixing bowl. Stir together until everything is well combined.
  2. Using a funnel, transfer the mixture into an empty container.

A Hydrangea For Every Garden

 

I am hard-pressed to name a shrub that matches the hydrangea for drama, splendor, and elegance in the garden. From the subtle white starry-shaped lacecap flower of  ‘Hayes Starburst’ to the dramatic, large white globes of ‘Incrediball’ — one of my favorites — there’s a hydrangea to fit almost any spot in the garden.

 

And with more advances in plant breeding, hydrangea selection has continued to expand to meet the still-growing demand for new plants. Now gardeners can choose from a wide array of re-blooming mopheads, a variety of new flower color options, and a multitude of dwarf sun- or shade-loving hydrangeas, starting at 12 inches in height.

It’s a great time to discover the versatility of this flexible shrub or reacquaint yourself with a plant that you might have written off as old-fashioned or poor blooming. Make no mistake — today’s hydrangeas are versatile, dynamic, and easy to grow.

While there are thousands of different hydrangeas and cultivated varieties, I’m going to talk about four main species and some of the varieties you may want to be on the lookout for H. arborescens (smooth hydrangea), H. macrophylla (bigleaf hydrangea), H. paniculata (hydrangea paniculata), and H. quercifolia (oakleaf hydrangea).

And while the different hydrangea species vary greatly, they all benefit from being planted in soil that is rich in organic matter and sited in a location with moist but well-drained soil. Adding compost or manure when planting will help with moisture retention, and, ironically, drainage. Despite its water-loving name, you don’t want your hydrangea to sit in soggy soil.

 


Arborescens — Smooth Hydrangea
H. arborescens is one of the hydrangea varieties native to North America, which makes it a fairly care-free selection. Hardy in zones 3 to 9, ‘Annabelle’ is probably the most well-known arborescens with large white round mophead flowers. It grows to about 4 feet by 4 feet, but blossoms will flop to the ground when it rains. Lucky for us, plant breeders have introduced an improved ‘Annabelle’ with thicker stems for more support — the ‘Incrediball’ hydrangea.

‘Incrediball’ makes a spectacular hedge, is great for cut flowers, and can be enjoyed as a specimen plant or placed in the back garden where its blooms can even be appreciated from a distance. And the variety just gets better. New this year is the dwarf version of ‘Annabelle’ — the ‘Invincebelle Wee White.’ At just 2-feet by 2-feet, this little powerhouse gives you an abundance of white flowers in a mini form. Also new is a pink/mauve version — ‘Invincibelle Mini Mauvette.’ It stands at about 3-feet tall and wide with strong stems.

This species blooms on new wood or the current season’s growth, so you don’t have to worry about improper pruning, hard winters, or late freezes that might kill off precious flower buds. They are best situated in the morning or dappled sun.

 

Macrophylla — Bigleaf Hydrangeas
Bigleaf hydrangeas, with their intense blue or deep pink round fluffy flowers, are the holy grail of blossoms for many gardeners. The old classic ‘Nikko Blue’ and many others only develop flower buds on old wood, or growth from the previous season, so extremely cold temperatures can result in damaged buds and no flowers. Or as I call it, “hydrangea heartache.”

Hydrangea Macrophylla ‘Rose’

Plant breeders have come through with new hydrangea varieties that bloom on both old and new wood. The leader in this field is the ‘Endless Summer’ series of hydrangeas, including the original ‘Endless Summer,’ which blooms pink, purple, or blue, depending on your soil pH and measures about 4 feet by 4 feet. It’s hardy in zones 4 to 9. Its sister plant, ‘BloomStruck,’ has similar flowers on dark purple stems. ‘Blushing Bride’ is a white version that is hardy in zones 5 to 9, and ‘Twist-n-Shout’ is a beautiful lacecap variety with red stems, hardy in zones 4 to 9.

And more remontant varieties are coming out every year. I especially like ‘Let’s Dance Rhythmic Blue,’ which is about 3 to 4 feet tall and wide and hardy in zones 5 to 9. But just like Nikko Blue, ‘Rhythmic Blue’ flowers will actually be pink in alkaline soil, so you may have to amend your soil with an acidifier product to create blue flowers.

H. macrophylla perform best when situated in the morning or dappled sun.

 

Paniculata — Panicle Hydrangea
Gardeners with full sunlight should consider the paniculata hydrangeas, so named because of their panicle-shaped flowers, which open a creamy white and age to a dusty rose as the summer progresses. And because they bloom on the current season’s growth, paniculatas are reliable, hardy bloomers.

One of the best-known and hardest working paniculatas is ‘Limelight,’ hardy in zones 3 to 9 and reaching up to 8 feet tall. But if that’s too much hydrangea for you, consider ‘Little Lime,’ a dwarf version that you can keep to about 3 feet tall with late winter or early spring pruning.

Other dwarf H. paniculatas worth considering include ‘Bobo’ and ‘Little Quick Fire,’ both hardy in zones 3 to 8.

H. paniculatas are the only hydrangea variety that will perform happily in full sun, but will also take part-sun.

Quercifolia — Oakleaf Hydrangea
Oakleaf hydrangeas are the other hydrangea species native to North America, making them low-maintenance, reliable, and outstanding in beauty. They also have the distinction of being a true, four-season shrub, with oak-leaf shaped foliage in spring; large, creamy white panicle flowers in the summer that age to a rosy hue; beautiful fall orange, red, and gold fall foliage; and an ornamental cinnamon-colored pealing bark that is visible in the winter. If you don’t have an oakleaf hydrangea already, then put it on your wish list.

 

Delicate and beautiful white Hydrangea quercifolia flowers close up. Also known as Oakleaf hydrangea or Oak-leaved hydrangea.

 

The true oakleaf species can reach 8 feet or taller and just as wide, so it’s not for the faint of heart. But if you’ve got the room, nothing beats the majesty and size of its foliage and flowers.

More manageable oakleaf hydrangeas include ‘Snow Queen’ and ‘Alice,’ both about 5 feet tall and hardy in zones 5 to 9.

Dwarf oakleaf version includes ‘Pee Wee,’ ‘Sikes Dwarf,’ and the relatively new ‘Ruby Slippers,’ which reaches about 4 feet tall and wide and has flowers that darken to a more ruby color. It’s hardy in zones 5 to 9.

And because oakleaf hydrangeas have woody stems, pruning is not recommended so that the stem’s original character and shape can be appreciated in the winter months. If you need a shorter variety, it’s worth searching for a dwarf form to prevent having to prune for size later. These hydrangeas prefer to be located in the morning or dappled sun.

 

Hydrangeas are available today in more colors and sizes than ever before, and with advances in plant breeding and growing consumer demand, the future looks bright for even better selections. Heirloom hydrangeas will always have a place in the garden, but I hope you consider one of the newer varieties if a spot opens up in your garden. You’ll be amazed by their performance and ease, which are plant traits that all of us gardeners seek.

Win-Win: Succulents offer pizzazz while thriving on neglect

As gardeners, we all have our favorite plants. Maybe you love hydrangeas (rightly so), daylilies, or hostas. Me? It’s no secret I’m a sucker for daffodils and peonies. But I’ve got to tell you, over the last few years I’ve had the most fun in the garden and in containers with succulents.

Working with these little beauties is almost like painting with plants because of their exceptional colors, and you get the added benefit of remarkable, quirky leaf shapes and textures — spiny and pointy, smooth and curvy, deliciously ruffled, flat as a pancake, or even perfectly round like a green pearl. It really is a delight to work — and create — with these unusual plants.

What is a succulent? This family of plants stores water in their leaves and stems, which makes them especially drought-tolerant, so perfect for neglectful gardeners. They can be annuals or perennials, depending on your plant zone, and you’ll find them in weather conditions ranging from northern Canada to the rainforests of Brazil.

You might automatically think of cactus, and it’s true, they are succulents — but not all succulents are cactus. Here are a few common plants that fall in the succulent category: aloe vera (Aloe barbadensis), mother-in-law tongue (Sansevieria), jade (Crassula), and hens and chicks (Sempervivum).

And honestly, because succulents have exploded in popularity in recent years, so many other fun and unusual varieties are readily available. I’ve seen them in big box stores, grocery stores, and department stores (although these are often faux, they look incredibly real).

Succulents are terribly easy to grow. They thrive with neglect and are usually only killed by overwatering. And when I say overwatering, that might mean watering more than once or twice a month — it is possible to kill these plants with kindness! All they require is a spot in the house with bright, suffused light. Hardy plants can be grown outdoors in full hot sun with steep drainage.

One of the keys to getting succulents to thrive indoors in containers is using potting soil specially designed for succulents or cactus. If you can’t find any, you can make your own by mixing regular potting soil with sand at a 1:1 ratio. Think desert.

Plants can be grown in shallow dish containers with holes for drainage, or shallow containers without holes if you water sparingly and judiciously.  You can also add a layer of rock at the bottom of the dish to hold any extra water that might collect.

These plants make a nice show when they’re planted snugly up against each other to fill a pot. The appearance of abundance is matched only by varying leaf colors in shades of greens, silver, gray, orange, and red. You also have the added texture and shape of different leaves, which can take a container arrangement to a whole new level of artfulness.

Or consider planting a single succulent in a small container and top-dress the potting soil with colored sand, rocks, or small seashells for an added pop of color. Have fun with it — plant a small cactus and add a miniature tombstone, long-horned steer skull, and a few tumbleweeds.

Some of my favorite succulents to play around with include:

  • Echeveria
  • Ox tongue (Gasteria)
  • String of pearls (Senecio rowleyanus)
  • Flapjack succulents (Kalanchoe thyrsiflora)
  • Living stones (Mesembryanthemum)

If you mix any combination of these five plants together, you’ll have a colorful, textural masterpiece. There’s something very tactile about these arrangements that make me want to touch them or even pat an arrangement with my fingers.

If you’re not yet on the succulent bandwagon, I encourage you to hop aboard. In fact, consider giving a small succulent arrangement as a gift to someone in your life who has a black thumb. If you take away their watering can, they’re bound to have years of enjoyment and you’ll be the horticultural hero who introduced them to these easy, tough, colorful plants.

Starting seeds indoors is easy, inexpensive, and a whole lotta fun

This time of year can be tough for gardeners. The holidays are over and we’re in a sort of gardening purgatory — I can see it on the horizon, but we’ve got plenty of cold, dreary days ahead before we can get outside and dig.

That’s one reason why I love starting seeds indoors — it gives me an opportunity to think about what lies ahead and actually do something. The ground may still be frozen, but I can start working on my vegetable and flower garden now.


If you’ve never tried starting seeds indoors, you’re missing out on one of the true delights of gardening. There’s something pretty great about having someone compliment me on something in my garden and being able to say in response, “Thanks, I grew it from seed.” It’s also a fun way to get my hands on plants that aren’t readily available at the local garden center, like heirloom plants, and rare and unusual vegetable and flower varieties.

Kick-off your seed growing venture by carefully reading the back of each seed packet. Some seeds require special treatment before planting, like soaking in water, chilling (called stratification), or nicking the seed coat (called scarification). You don’t want to find yourself ready to plant and then discover that your seeds need to chill in the refrigerator for a few weeks.

Another key to seed-starting success is timing, and that starts with your last average spring frost date. Here in Little Rock, we’re zone 8a, so our last average frost date is March 28. Most seed packets will tell you when to start growing indoors, often saying “Start 4 to 6 weeks before your average last frost date.” So I simply look at the calendar and countback.


Next, choose containers for growing. You can use a variety of things around the house, including old yogurt cups, egg cartons, or hand-rolled pots made from newspapers. I picked up some seed starting trays from a nursery that I can reuse each year. I simply sterilize them between uses with a mixture of one part bleach to nine parts water.

I’ve also had good luck using a quality potting soil to grow my seeds, but you can certainly invest in a soil-less seed starting mix. Whichever you choose, put your growing medium in a bucket with some water so that the soil is slightly damp before you fill your containers.

Seed packets will tell you how deep the seed needs to be planted. For example, Bachelor’s Button ‘Blue Boy’ (Centaurea cyanus) seeds need to be planted 1/4″ deep, with three seeds planted every 8″ – 10.” The packet also tells me that seedlings will emerge in seven to 14 days, so I have a good idea when to start looking for signs of life.

Once seeds are planted, you need to water. This is where it helps to have your potting mixture already moist. You can use a spray bottle filled with water to give your seeds a thorough misting, which provides enough moisture without roiling all your hard work.

I always cover my seed trays with plastic to create a mini greenhouse. Some seed trays come with plastic domes, or you can use kitchen plastic wrap, sandwich bags, or you can even slip your containers inside a clear plastic dry-cleaning bag. It doesn’t have to look pretty, just be effective.

Also, most seeds don’t need light to germinate, but they do need heat. I recommend finding a location that is ideally around 70 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit, which may be in your kitchen, near your oven or on top of a refrigerator. (It helps to have a spouse or roommate who doesn’t mind dirt in the kitchen.) You can also use a seed heating mat, which is specially designed to heat soil and seeds from the bottom.

Once you see seedlings, remove the plastic covering and place plants in a spot with bright light. If you’re using a spot by a window, rotate your containers every few days so that seedlings don’t develop a lean. If you don’t have enough sunlight, you can always use grow lights or even fluorescent shop lights. Place the bulbs so that they’re only a few inches above the seedlings and set a timer so that lights are automatically on 12 to 16 hours a day.

The final step is to keep plants growing until it’s time to harden them off as they move outside in the spring. I’ll admit, I’ve had a few bombs — seeds that were too old to germinate or a tray that got overwatered and killed a crop of seedlings. But there are way more successes than failures, and that’s what keeps me coming back to seeds year after year. And on cold gray February and March days, seed starting is a life-line to spring gardening that I’ll grab every time.

Daffodils on my Mind

I believe that there is a small part within each of us that is delighted each spring to see the first daffodils in bloom.

These certainly are among the bravest of flowers, one of the first to herald the arrival of spring, and often pressing on in the most inhospitable of weather conditions. 

A cheerful mainstay at Moss Mountain Farm, each year these little perennial bulbs transform an ordinary farm field into an undulating golden blanket of bloom, all happening during a magical window of time that is mesmerizing. Over the course of their most floriferous month, March, these blooms reach a heightened pitch by mid-month with early and late bloomers extending the season by bookending the March crescendo.

However, I should say we have blooms as early as January and as late as the first week of May. This range of bloom time is less about the zone in which we garden, but more about the varieties or ‘cultivars’ of daffodils we have chosen. I have consciously and purposely stretched the season of bloom to almost five months on our zone 8 farm by choosing specific daffodils.

We always start with the arrival of Rynveld’s Early Sensation, as it’s a notoriously early bloomer. Some years it can be seen blooming the first week of January. We end the season with some unnamed tazetta types that have been at Moss Mountain since time in-memoriam, usually the first week of May. During this range of bloom, I have always tried to plant enough of a single variety for cutting and bringing indoors without making too much of a dent in the display. We use fresh flowers in the house constantly, and the daffodils can be a consistent source of bloom while many flowers are still fast asleep. 

I prefer to pick in bundles of the same type and use them in a myriad of vase sizes. Simple and bold is best since this approach delights the eye. While wandering the fields at Moss Mountain Farm, you’ll see a pattern of planting where the bulbs are in natural drifts of like kind. These swaths reflect the notion of simple and bold in the landscape.

Each year we try to plant a few new varieties, including cultivars that are the ‘Johnny-come-latelies’ among narcissus hybridizers. Daffodils mainly come from Holland, but there are also English, Irish, and American breeders. One recent favorite of mine is a double type called Replete. It’s soft salmon and cream corona and cream collar are ideal for certain rooms in the house, and it’s always a delight to visitors when in bloom. In short, it looks like a yummy dessert. It’s worth mentioning that deer will not eat daffodils of any kind, as delectable as they may appear.

‘Replete’ Double Daffodil

For the best selection of these newer varieties, the earlier in the season one can purchase the bulbs the better. The bulb catalogs start showing up just after Labor Day. I try to get my order in by late August or early September, but I’m not always that attentive. When I delay, I just cringe when the sight of ‘sold out’ inevitably appears over the new cultivars I’ve missed. Then it’s another year’s wait, at least, to see them leap off the pages of the catalog and into my garden. I’ve teamed up with Gilbert H. Wild and curated my favorite daffodil bulb collections, Moss Mountain Farm Daffodil Mix at Gilbert H. Wild & Sons, I hope you enjoy them!

 

However, bulb planting time can be more relaxed, if not forgiving. I’ve planted daffodils as early as October and as late, dare I say, as January. As long as the bulbs have been stored in a cool, dark place and haven’t gone soft, my recommendation is to get them into the ground. Also worth mentioning, while storing bulbs in a refrigerator is a good idea, they can be damaged when stored with produce. Apples seem to be the most egregious of fruits, emitting ethylene gas that will destroy the flower embryo. 

Daffodils play well with others and make terrific company with other spring bulbs. On the front of the season they harmonize with crocus, and later it’s the Spanish Bluebells and Snowflakes you’ll find them singing among. Early perennials such as Phlox (Phlox subulata and divaricata), Heuchera, and Virginia Bluebells also play well with daffodils.

Each time you see daffodils this spring think about where you can add some in your garden, as they will bring you joy for years to come. If you get the itch to see lots of daffodils this spring, plan a visit to see us at Moss Mountain Farm in March.